Contents
  1. #GIRLBOSS by Sophia Amoruso – review
  2. #GIRLBOSS by Sophia Amoruso – review
  3. #GIRLBOSS: Sophia Amoruso: Books - adundestikir.ga
  4. Sophia Amoruso

GIRLBOSS book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. In the New York Times bestseller that the Washington Post called “Lean. . As women continue to break the glass ceiling, here are the best books for every hustling girlboss navigating her career. THE RUNAWAY NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER The first thing Sophia Amoruso sold online wasn't fashion—it was a stolen book. She spent her teens.

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Girl Boss Book

In the New York Times bestseller that the Washington Post called “Lean In for misfits,” Sophia Amoruso shares how she went from dumpster diving to founding . GIRLBOSS Book Review by The Travel Tester: Nasty Gal Sophia Amoruso's Lessons Learned from Starting a Business from Scratch. In the New York Times bestseller that the Washington Post called “Lean In for misfits,” Sophia Amoruso shares how she went from dumpster diving.

Shelves: memoirs-biographies Having been Nasty Gal's first intern during the early days in Berkeley when it was just Sophia and Christina the first full-time employee who is now downloading Director , my rating may be a little biased so feel free to take everything from this point forward with a grain of salt. I won't bother with a short summary as this book has gotten enough press and reviews from readers alike that that just seems redundant. What I will say is that having worked with Sophia firsthand and having accompanied her Having been Nasty Gal's first intern during the early days in Berkeley when it was just Sophia and Christina the first full-time employee who is now downloading Director , my rating may be a little biased so feel free to take everything from this point forward with a grain of salt. What I will say is that having worked with Sophia firsthand and having accompanied her on what was Nasty Gal's second downloading trip ever, her work ethic is a cut above the rest; she eats, sleeps and breathes Nasty Gal always has and probably always will. There are parts in the book where she may come across a bit lofty, but she's just telling it like it is and not making any excuses. She briefly touches on the subject of extroverts and introverts, mentioning "psychologists now believe that social media is a really valuable tool for introverts, because it allows them to communicate and even network on their own terms. What makes Sophia such an icon to girls around the world partly is her relatability. But she is one in trillion if you read the book, you'll get what I mean. And what she doesn't reveal directly in Girlboss - though hints of it are given along the way - is that she is a voracious learner, an avid reader and a hyper critical thinker with killer business gumption. In my opinion, these are just some of the most common characteristics I've seen across-the-board of successful entrepreneurs, and just above-average humans in general. All in all, the book is a quick and entertaining read with snippets of slightly outrageous and hilarious stories from Sophia's past, wisdoms imparted by many other Girlbosses including fashion designer Norma Kamali, Christene Barberich, editor of Refinery 29 and Leandra Medine of Manrepeller.

I had never even heard of Nasty Gal when I picked this e-book from the library. But the title seemed fun and I always enjoy reading business books - especially ones that tackle the unique issues that face women. But this? This is not that book. I'll say this - Sophia has done a great job of getting where she is now. She's obviously creative and obviously hard working. But I don't know who this book is written for. It is mainly biographical which is fine - but then has these girlboss lessons that I had never even heard of Nasty Gal when I picked this e-book from the library.

#GIRLBOSS by Sophia Amoruso – review

It is mainly biographical which is fine - but then has these girlboss lessons that made me cringe. One page will assume you've never put together a decent resume and then a few pages later it's giving you advice about how you can't be friends with your direct reports. It seems to assume that I have no business experience and am in charge of people - mainly because that's what Sophia dealt with - absolutely no business experience or formalized business education and was in charge of her own business.

Which is awesome for her but rare that others will go on that sort of girlboss trajectory. Also, it's extremely difficult to read the book and she's mentioning that in meetings she gets annoyed when people don't talk to her directly because they assume she doesn't know what she's talking about but then says she often makes people repeat themselves a number of times until she understands the business concepts because she has no training but she's the CEO so she has to understand.

I know she got where she is by not going to business school but maybe she could look into a little bit of formal training? It's not an employees job to give you a crash course in topics they learned in their MBA. I think I would have enjoyed this more if it was just a straight biography and gave up the pretense of telling people how to be girlbosses.

I also googled Nasty Gal after reading the book and came upon a Glass Door page where the company is rated VERY low in employee satisfaction and a trustpilot page where it also is rated very low in shopper satisfaction.

It made it seem as if the author lacks awareness about her company. This is not Lean In for a younger generation. Nov 06, Jessica rated it it was ok.

#GIRLBOSS by Sophia Amoruso – review

I so wanted this to be good, but after reading the introduction, I knew that I was probably not going to enjoy it. After she addressed the issue of whether or not her book was a feminist manifesto by saying that she believes in "showing up and owning it" not "whining" for equality, I was pretty much soured on everything else she had to say. But I persevered. And while there were some good parts of the book - she does have some interesting things to say about venture capitalism and hiring and fir I so wanted this to be good, but after reading the introduction, I knew that I was probably not going to enjoy it.

And while there were some good parts of the book - she does have some interesting things to say about venture capitalism and hiring and firing - there were so many other things that made me want to throw the book against the wall in abject frustration. For a book that purports to be about women who don't take themselves too seriously, I don't think I have ever read a book by a person who took themselves MORE seriously.

The most frustrating part for me was when she said that she didn't believe in luck. Like this multimillion dollar company that she built up from nothing, which experienced unprecedented levels of growth such that industry professionals were all agog, exists simply because Sophia Amoruso was the first person in the world to discover working hard, and there were no outside forces outside of her control that influenced the situation and helped her to get there.

And then, after those few paragraphs, she goes on to talk about chaos magic and positive thinking not like The Secret but basically if you think positively, things will happen for you and says, "If you let yourself meander a bit, the right things and the right people will fall into place. Contradictory, self-indulgent, tone deaf and frustrating.

Pretty disappointing. View all 4 comments. Nov 25, Nat rated it it was ok Shelves: In GIRLBOSS , Sophia Amoruso recounts her life from stumbling upon her passion of selling vintage clothes online and becoming an unlikely businesswoman to building her retail fashion empire. Just be your own idol. Also, the author's bragging and over-the-top tone was a little off-putting at times, so I ended up skimming the last pages.

I did, however, really look forward to the illustrations featured throughout: And I would like to pay homage to that first half by quoting some of my favorite phrases: It does not mean that you are stupid or worthless, or that you are never going to succeed at anything.

#GIRLBOSS: Sophia Amoruso: Books - adundestikir.ga

It just means that your talents lie elsewhere, so take the opportunity to seek out what you are good at, and find a place where you can flourish. The earlier in your life that you can learn that, the easier the rest of it will be.

You is who you is, so get used to it. I'm an site Affiliate.

I'll make a small commission! download a Coffee for nat bookspoils with Ko-fi. Jun 06, Ami rated it it was ok.

It's overwhelmingly clear from the book that Sophia Amoruso is a hard worker. She's dedicated to her business, she's extremely talented at what she does, and I suspect she'd be pretty fun to attend a party with even thought she would probably make you wear silver leather pants. That being said, this book just didn't do it for me.

Amoruso neglects the more fascinating elements of her story, like the fact that she went from being the "youngest person at a San Francisco Marxist book club" and eatin It's overwhelmingly clear from the book that Sophia Amoruso is a hard worker. Amoruso neglects the more fascinating elements of her story, like the fact that she went from being the "youngest person at a San Francisco Marxist book club" and eating dumpster bagels to being a CEO with a brand-new Porsche. I don't mean to slam her for changing her mind on capitalism, but it would have been very interesting and pretty informative to see exactly how that transition happened and whether she thinks that is appropriate for everyone.

Instead we get vague pieces of advice like, don't bad talk your boss on social media after you're fired. There's a chapter that outlines the importance of using sigil magic to ensure your progress through ranks that felt totally off the wall.

The off-the-wall-ness does work for her sometimes, especially within the context of a business book. Sheryl Sandberg certainly isn't telling you about the Halloween she dressed as a 70s Blaxploitation character and tried to beat up her boyfriend's ex. Those stories, and how they helped her become a better person, are silly and illuminating. I just wish there were more of them. View all 5 comments. Sep 17, Kelsey Searles rated it did not like it.

From the first page I knew I wasn't going to like this book. Beyond it being poorly written sounds like a teenager's rambling life story , it doesn't have any true focus or offer any innovative or interesting advice. Most of the advice work hard, don't have typos in your resume, attention to detail are well known, common, and repeated in countless books, television shows, etc She also comes off as an un-relateable and unbelievable character.

She worked hard in all her jobs? And yet most lasted no longer than 2-weeks? She does an incredible amount of bragging about her successes and everyone loving her, and rambles her way through her story at a very high level.

I found myself constantly irritated with her. Good for you for starting a successful company, that's awesome. Your story just isn't interesting or well written enough to tell.

Nice thing: So I finished it in a day and moved onto something far better. Nov 23, Heidi The Reader rated it liked it Shelves: GIRLBOSS is Sophia Amoruso's story about her wild childhood, unlikely and extraordinarily successful business venture and her treatise on how to be yourself and bring what is unique to you to your professional life. I googled Sophia after I finished this book and was dismayed to discover she has declared bankruptcy.

It seems she still has a successful motivational speaker program going on, but, for whatever reason, her business hasn't worked out. I suspect, she will land on her feet and start agai GIRLBOSS is Sophia Amoruso's story about her wild childhood, unlikely and extraordinarily successful business venture and her treatise on how to be yourself and bring what is unique to you to your professional life.

I suspect, she will land on her feet and start again. I never intended to be a role model, but there are parts of my story, and the lessons I've learned from it, that I want to share. Sophia believes in being yourself. Let your freak flag fly. Embrace your weirdness- because that is what ultimately makes you great. Being a Girlboss is as much about being the boss of your career as it is of your home.

Between Sophia's business tips and memoir, she includes quotations. Such as: Sophia wanted a job where she didn't have to work and could get paid for doing, essentially, nothing. She found that job and surfed the internet most of the time. In doing so, she studied online communities like MySpace and site and concluded that she could network and sell items with the best of them.

And she did. Sophia is a believer in creating your own reality: And that's really not magic at all. It's just recognizing the fact that we control our thoughts and our thoughts control our lives.

This is an extremely simple, totally straightforward concept, but for a lot of people, it's so alien that it might as well be magic.

Sophia, like Obi Wan Kenobi, does not believe in luck. She believes in hard work, action and selective focus. But before you start to think you just got lucky, remember that it's magic, and you made it yourself. Come bankruptcies and whatever else, I believe Sophia Amoruso will be just fine.

Don't you? Funny, entertaining, sassy, sarcastic, and incredibly smart. I took so much from this book and I have a strong feeling I'll be rereading it once I'm done with university. Pick this up if you Funny, entertaining, sassy, sarcastic, and incredibly smart.

Sophia Amoruso

Pick this up if you feel like you need a motivational push in your life no matter what area of your life you need said push for. This book is all about kicking ass and being your personal best against all odds.

Highly recommend! View 1 comment. May 16, Jenna rated it really liked it Shelves: I thought that perhaps I was a freak of nature until I read this book and realized that there is someone out there so much like me! Therefore, I found this read quite inspirational. She never knew what she really wanted to do until she found herself caught in the middle of a prospering company, while feeding a hobby that she hoped would keep her from having a job where she had to talk with people.

She never I thought that perhaps I was a freak of nature until I read this book and realized that there is someone out there so much like me! She never went to college and I believe she didn't finish high school but she's extremely intuitive and street smart. She's not afraid to speak her mind. She also doesn't allow others to intimidate her and although this book isn't a literary masterpiece, she has a way of showing the reader that in order to get ahead that you have to keep pushing and never back down.

I am a bit confused, however, about how she exclaims that traditional education isn't for everyone and some of the smartest girlbosses started organically or from experience yet I noticed on her career opportunities page that she lists her job's qualifications and requires that they all have the traditional education that she says isn't needed for everyone to succeed.

In the end, I found this book to be thought provoking and hopeful. I am in a similar situation as she was as far as having surgery and then feeling stuck and wanting to work on my own terms and peacefully and I could see how someone can use this book to inspire them when life gets a bit tough.

So, I definitely credit Sophia for giving me that extra pick-me-up when I so desperately needed it during a very difficult transition in my life. View all 11 comments. This book was overly flippant on a lot of things. A lot of stuff sounded controversional. Some of it plain stupid. The approach to business felt as in the 'wring-them-and-kick-them-out' attitude.

The 'I recognise the crazies during job interviews' approach is, well, irritating. I don't think this gal is a professional psychologist any more than she is a professional businessman or a writer. The general originality might merit this book 1,5 star. The rest is a very successful exercise in i Ahem The rest is a very successful exercise in irritating me.

Aug 13, Krista Regester rated it liked it. Considering that this was written in I would love to read a more updated version. View all 6 comments. Jun 22, Elizabeth Schlatter rated it did not like it Shelves: So I mistakenly thought this was going to be about being a boss.

It's really about the author, her life, her mistakes, what she's learned from them, and the meteoric success of her online company, Nasty Gal, which sells clothes. Certainly it's impressive that Amoruso became such a successful entrepreneur, at so young an age I think she's now 30 , and by utilizing social media to not just shape a distinct brand but also to identify, target, and respond to her customers.

It's a small world. She went from school drop-out to anarchist shoplifter to small-time site seller to CEO of a company with employees. The big question is this: is her success repeatable?

Unfortunately, the evidence is thin. Like many people who have succeeded in business, she is keener to talk about her winning personal attributes than the lucky breaks she had along the way. Let's start with the shoplifting: she admits to several light-fingered years where she confused "destroying capitalism" with "nicking things and selling them for profit".

What she stole — rugs, spirulina, oil pastels — gives a clue as to why she got away with it: who would think the worst of a pretty well-spoken white girl waltzing towards the door with a stack of hardbacks under her arm? Even when she gets caught wheeling a shopping cart filled with a basketball, a shower curtain and a George Foreman grill out of a chain store, the security staff let her off with a fine, rather than involving the police.

Would they have shown the same leniency to a young black man? Later, when Amaruso starts selling vintage clothes online, she catches another lucky break, hitting site when it seemed like a homespun alternative to boring 3D shops.

The first item she sold was a book she had stolen as a teenager. Amoruso claims to have been banned from site in for posting hyperlinks in feedback to customers and launched Nasty Gal as its own retail website. Nasty Gal developed an online following of young women on social media. Magazine named her to its 30 under 30 list. In an interview with Dan Schawbel of Forbes , Amoruso admitted that she felt incompatible with the demands of being a CEO, and advised that people seeking positions as CEOs continue to seek managerial positions.

In , Amoruso founded Girlboss Media, a company that creates editorial content, videos, and podcasts aimed at a female audience.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Sophia Christina Amoruso. San Diego , California , U. Joel DeGraff m. Retrieved 24 April California Birth Index.

Retrieved September 11, Retrieved December 19, Retrieved September 10, Retrieved Retrieved 20 December Pappas Post. Retrieved September 9, America Online.