The web that has no weaver pdf.

 
    Contents
  1. The Web That Has No Weaver: Understanding Chinese Medicine
  2. Download[PDF] The web that has no weaver: Understanding Chinese medicine Ted J Kaptchuk FullBook
  3. Chinese Medicine. The web that has no weaver
  4. The Web That Has No Weaver: Understanding Chinese Medicine by Ted J. Kaptchuk - Read Online

Editorial Reviews. About the Author. Ted J. Kaptchuk, O.M.D., is associate director of the Center for Alternative Medicine Research and Education at the Beth. Book details Author: Ted J. Kaptchuk Pages: pages Publisher: Congdon & Weed Language: English ISBN ISBN Book is in Very good condition adundestikir.ga Web That Has No Weaver: Understanding Chinese Medicine [PDF] pages. Download PDF The Web That Has No Weaver: Understanding Chinese Medicine, PDF Download The Web That Has No Weaver.

Author:DARYL PEDRALBA
Language:English, Spanish, German
Country:Paraguay
Genre:Health & Fitness
Pages:256
Published (Last):12.10.2015
ISBN:480-5-24292-387-4
Distribution:Free* [*Registration Required]
Uploaded by: SHAVONNE

75727 downloads 122128 Views 31.80MB PDF Size Report


The Web That Has No Weaver Pdf.

Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version. Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (K), or click on a page image below. The web that has no weaver: understanding Chinese medicine by Ted J. Kaptchuk; 5 editions; First published in ; Subjects: Chinese Medicine, Philosophy. Request PDF on ResearchGate | On Jan 1, , Tj Kaptchuk and others published The Web That Has No Weaver: Understanding Chinese Medicine.

Chinese medicine is a healing art that has survived and continues to thrive in East Asia and is increasingly becoming a global resource. The Web That Has No Weaver is the classic English language introductory text that explains how medicine so rooted the archaic past can be relevant to modern health care. The book demystifies the worldview of Chinese medicine. Yin and yang, dampness and wind are easily comprehended. The Web lets the reader see, feel and discover aspects of illness that modern biomedicine overlooks or cannot even understand. The use of acupuncture and herbal medicine to regain harmony and balance is explained. The book is both accessible and scholarly and also incorporates the viewpoint of modern science. For students, scholars, health care providers and the general public, The Web has earned its place as the foremost authority synthesizing Western and Eastern approaches to healing. This revised second edition is the product of years of further reflection on ancient Chinese sources and active involvement in cutting-edge scientific research. We recommend it to our colleagues in China.

I think if I had read Lonny Jarrett or J. Worsley first I would have been thrown off by their language.

This book allowed me to move into the idea of the medicine before I needed to understand the origins. For someone with a ne This gets an extra star for being my introduction to Chinese medicine. For someone with a new interest in acupuncture, I would recommend this along with Peter Eckman's Footsteps of the Yellow Emperor.

May 16, Stefanie rated it it was ok Shelves: I'm really interested in learning about Traditional Chinese Medicine, and this book was recommended to me by my acupuncturist. But, I have to say, I'm getting annoyed by the repetitive style of the author. I think he's so convinced that Westerners won't "get" it that he says things a million times.

And maybe I won't "get" it, but the repetition isn't helping. Ok, I finished it, relatively speaking. I got impatient and started skipping to parts that seemed like they would be relevant to me.

Yeah, I'm really interested in learning about Traditional Chinese Medicine, and this book was recommended to me by my acupuncturist.

Yeah, I was trying to diagnose myself. Anyway, I am more familiar with TCM, now. Jul 16, Terry rated it liked it Recommended to Terry by: Andrea Johanson. I read this interesting book after my first visit to an accupuncturist.

The book was written initially as a laymen's guide, but turns into something pretty technical. It convinced me that Chinese medicine is a valuable tool particularly in addressing disorders which Western medicine does not understand; even better, the accupuncture I recieved helped me get over severe back pain. Not a book to read if you just want to know herbs and folk remedies.

This is a book for someone wanting to understand Chinese Medicine, whether to know how to use it, or if you are planning on studying it. It does an excellent job of explaining why Chinese Medicine is not some mystical idea, but an actual art and science just like Western medicine.

The difference between two very different seeming medical modalities can be bridged once one transcends the inflexible concept that there is only one worldview I have "lost" this book to borrowers so many times I have lost count!

I just download a new one Jun 27, Bill Blocksom rated it really liked it. This is an excellent book. It is an in depth look at Chinese Medicine from the view of the practitioner. I know that is has been used as a required text in Acupuncture training. After I gave up thinking I was going to remember every detail, I was able to read this a get a good sense of the subject, its artistry, and the contrast with Western medicine.

I recommend this book. Jul 07, Heather Rose rated it really liked it. This is a deep book which is considered one of the essentials for understanding the medicine taught at Bastyr University. It also has alot of appeal to the study of medical anthropology. Oct 27, Nated Doherty added it Recommends it for: I've never gotten all the way through this, but i've gotten as much out of this as I have out of books i've read all the way through.

I absolutely love this book! I read it all the way through in Now I continue to pick it up and reference it all the time! Nov 07, Jennifer rated it did not like it.

Jun 24, Doris Jean rated it it was amazing. I like this book. Feb 15, Jess rated it really liked it Shelves: My dear cousin Jill bought this for me for Christmas in a stack of other books that were perfectly calibrated to my current interests. Lucky me! I didn't read all the way to the end page, and I didn't get through the amazingly comprehensive footnotes, but I did read the body of the book and it was fascinating and very helpful to understand more about the philosophy behind Chinese medicine, which I'd really only understood vaguely before.

The Web That Has No Weaver: Understanding Chinese Medicine

Folks cite this as the book for beginners wanting to learn My dear cousin Jill bought this for me for Christmas in a stack of other books that were perfectly calibrated to my current interests. Folks cite this as the book for beginners wanting to learn more about Chinese medicine and acupuncture, and it was quite readable. I admit I tried to do a little self-diagnosing while reading which probably didn't help my overall comprehension, but in the end, I do feel like I understand a lot more than I did when I began.

I now know just enough to know how little I know, what a subtle, detailed, and deep art Chinese medicine is, and more about how it relates to Western medicine.

It was also fun to understand a bit more about phrases or advice that I would hear from my mum or aunties about "heaty" or "cooling" foods and put them into a broader context. I have a feeling I'll be keeping this one on my shelf and referring to it over time. Dec 04, Ann Michael rated it really liked it.

A good introduction to the differences between western and eastern approaches to health and wellness, but this book is likely to be a bit tedious for the casual reader, as Kaptchuk is quite thorough and goes into the philosophy as well as the 'medicine. It's well-documented with hundreds of studies and weighs the advantages and disadvantages of the traditional Chinese approach to wellness and to cu A good introduction to the differences between western and eastern approaches to health and wellness, but this book is likely to be a bit tedious for the casual reader, as Kaptchuk is quite thorough and goes into the philosophy as well as the 'medicine.

It's well-documented with hundreds of studies and weighs the advantages and disadvantages of the traditional Chinese approach to wellness and to cure. Jul 10, Medea rated it it was amazing Shelves: This book was on our reading list for first year Acupuncture school. For someone coming from an orthodox medical science background, it was a very good bridging text.

Oct 11, Meghan rated it liked it Shelves: The fifth patient experiences much sour belching and has headaches. Her pain is sharp, and, although massaging the abdomen makes it diminish, heat and cold have no effect. She is very moody. Emotional distress, especially anger, seems to precipitate attacks of pain. She feels frustrated and stuck in many of her life activities.

During the discussion she says her husband is distant and detached. The physician concludes that she is affected by the pattern of Disharmony of the Liver invading the Spleen. The sixth patient has an extremely severe stabbing pain in the stomach that sometimes goes around to his back.

Download[PDF] The web that has no weaver: Understanding Chinese medicine Ted J Kaptchuk FullBook

The pain is much worse after eating and is aggravated by touch. He has had episodes of vomiting blood, and produces blackish stools. The patient is very thin and has a rather dark complexion. His eyes furtively and suspiciously dart around the room, as if to detect a hidden threat. He had been physically abused as a political prisoner. His tongue is a darkish purple and has markedly red eruptions on the sides. His pulse is choppy. So the Chinese doctor, searching for and organizing signs and symptoms that a Western doctor might never heed, distinguishes six patterns of disharmony where Western medicine perceives only one disease.

The patterns of disharmony are similar to what the West calls diseases in that their discovery tells the physician how to prescribe treatment. But they are different from diseases because they cannot be isolated from the patient in whom they occur. When confronted by a patient with stomach pain, the Western physician must look beyond the screen of symptoms for an underlying pathological mechanism—a peptic ulcer in this case, but it could have been an infection or a tumor or a nervous disorder.

A Chinese physician examining the same patient must discern a pattern of disharmony made up of the entire accumulation of symptoms and signs. The Chinese method is based on the idea that no single part can be understood except in its relation to the whole. A symptom, therefore, is not traced back to a cause, but is looked at as a part of a totality. Understanding that overall pattern, with the symptom as part of it, is the challenge of Chinese medicine.

The Chinese system is not less logical than the Western, just less analytical. The logic underlying Chinese medical theory—a logic that assumes that a part can be understood only in its relation to the whole—can also be called synthetic or dialectical.

In Chinese early naturalist and Taoist thought, this dialectical logic that explains relationships, patterns, and change is called Yin-Yang theory. Yin-Yang theory is based on the philosophical construct of two polar complements, called Yin and Yang.

These complementary opposites are neither forces nor material entities. Nor are they mythical concepts that transcend rationality. Rather, they are convenient labels used to describe how things function in relation to each other and to the universe. They are used to explain the continuous process of natural change. But Yin and Yang are not only a set of correspondences; they also represent a way of thinking.

In this system of thought, all things are seen as parts of a whole. No entity can ever be isolated from its relationship to other entities; no thing can exist in and of itself. Fixed essences are abstractions; there are no absolutes. Yin and Yang must, necessarily, contain within themselves the possibility of opposition and change.

The character for Yin originally meant the shady side of a slope. It is associated with such qualities as cold, rest, responsiveness, passivity, darkness, interiority, downwardness, inwardness, decrease, satiation, tranquility, and quiescence.

It is the end, completion, and realized fruition. The original meaning of Yang was the sunny side of a slope.

The term implies brightness and is part of one common Chinese expression for the sun. Yang is associated with qualities such as heat, stimulation, movement, activity, excitement, vigor, light, exteriority, upwardness, outwardness, and increase. It is arousal, beginning, and dynamic potential.

Working with these ideas, Chinese thought and Chinese medical tradition have developed five principles of Yin and Yang. Thus, time can be divided into night and day, place into earth and heaven, season into inactive periods fall and winter and active periods spring and summer , species into female and male, temperature into cold and hot, weight into light and heavy, and so on. Inside and outside, down and up, passive and active, empty and full are all examples of Yin-Yang categories.

These qualities are opposites, yet they describe relative aspects of the same phenomena. Yin and Yang qualities exist in relation to each other. In terms of the body, the front is considered Yin and the back Yang. The upper part of the body is considered more Yang than the lower part; the outer parts of the body skin, hair, etc. In terms of the psyche, willfulness, desire, and assertiveness are Yang; Yin is acceptance, responsiveness, repose, and responsibility. The Yin and Yang are often described metaphorically as Water and fire.

Illnesses that are characterized by weakness, slowness, coldness, and underactivity are Yin; illnesses that manifest strength, forceful movements, heat, and overactivity are Yang. The philosopher Zou Yen c.

Heaven is high, the earth is low, and thus [Heaven and Earth] are fixed. As the high and low are thus made clear, the honorable and humble have their place accordingly. As activity and tranquillity have their constancy, the strong and the weak are thus differentiated. Cold and hot season take their turn. This means that within each Yin and Yang category, another Yin and Yang category can be distinguished.

It is an extension of the logic that divides all phenomena into Yin and Yang aspects, allowing further division within aspects ad infinitum. For example, temperature can be divided into cold Yin and hot Yang , but cold can be divided further into icy cold Yin and moderately cold Yang. In the body, the front of the trunk is Yin compared with the back, but the front can be divided further so that the abdomen is Yin in relation to the chest. Within a Yin illness characterized by Coldness there may be aspects of Yang such as sharp, forceful contractions.

Within a Yang illness of Heat and hyperactivity there may be weakness and loss of weight, both Yin qualities. There is nothing in the world greater than the tip of a hair that grows in the autumn, while Mount Tai is small. No one lives a longer life than a child who dies in infancy, but Peng Zu who lived many hundred years died prematurely. Although Yin and Yang can be distinguished, they cannot be separated.

They depend on each other for definition. And the things in which Yin and Yang are distinguished could not be defined without the existence of Yin and Yang qualities.

For instance, one cannot speak of temperature apart from its Yin and Yang aspects, cold and heat. Similarly, one could not speak of height unless there were both tallness and shortness. Such opposite aspects depend on and define each other.

Chinese Medicine. The web that has no weaver

Another example might be the relationship between a couple in which one partner can be relatively passive only if the other partner is relatively aggressive, and vice versa. Passivity and aggression can be measured only in comparison with each other. The activity Yang of the body is nourished by its physical form Yin , and the physical form is created and maintained by the activity of the body.

In illness, overactivity has meaning only in relation to a condition of underactivity, and vice versa. If Yin is excessive, then Yang will be too weak, and vice versa.

If the temperature is neither too cold nor too hot, then both cold and hot aspects are mutually controlled and held in check. If it is too cold, then there is not enough heat, and vice versa. Yin and Yang balance each other. In our example of the couple, the extent to which one partner can be aggressive depends on the extent to which the other is passive, and vice versa. They exert mutual control over each other. An illness of fire may be due to insufficient Water; an illness of Water may be due to insufficient fire.

This action might not be possible to undo. Are you sure you want to continue? Upload Sign In Join. Home Books Science. Save For Later. Create a List. Understanding Chinese Medicine by Ted J. Summary Chinese medicine is a healing art that has survived and continues to thrive in East Asia and is increasingly becoming a global resource. Read on the Scribd mobile app Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere.

BookBaby Released: Dec 8, ISBN: George T. Integrating the Best of Conventional and Complementary Approaches to Cancer Ted Kaptchuk is without question one of the most innovative thinkers in the area of Traditional Chinese Medicine. The web that has no weaver: Includes index. ISBN 1. Medicine, Chinese. Medicine, Chinese—Philosophy. This book is printed on acid-free paper. Qi, Blood, Essence, Spirit, and Fluids or the basic ingredients of human life 3. The Harmonious Landscape and on anatomy and its absence 4.

The Meridians: The Warp and Woof and on acupuncture and herbology 5.

Origins of Disharmony: Stormy Weather or when a cause is not a cause 6. Signs and Symptoms and Aristotle and Lao Tzu revisited 7.

The Patterns of the Human Landscape the details of the clinical scene 9. The Stages of Disease: A Series of Clinical Scenes B. Yang Organs in Disharmony C. Pulses Revisited D. The Curious Organs E. Efficacy and Adverse Effects F. Historical Bibliography: Links in the Chain of Transmission H. Caudill Early in the Is, in the wake of a new politically sanctioned exchange of information between China and the United States, there appeared in the press a number of anecdotal descriptions of surgery without anesthesia being performed in China.

Margaret A. Caudill, M. Andrew Weil, M. Being and non-being produce each other; Difficult and easy complete each other; Long and short contrast each other; High and low distinguish each other; Sound and voice harmonize each other; Front and back follow each other.

You already recently rated this item.

Your rating has been recorded. Write a review Rate this item: Preview this item Preview this item. The web that has no weaver: Ted J Kaptchuk Publisher: Chicago, Ill: The Web That Has No Weaver is a classic and comprehensive volume that discusses the theory and practice of Chinese medicine.

Kaptchuk's book is an invaluable resource in the field and an authoritative guide that helps readers understand both Western and Eastern healing practices.

Here in the revised edition is further research into ancient Chinese practices as well as active involvement in cutting-edge scientific research. Read more Show all links. Allow this favorite library to be seen by others Keep this favorite library private.

Find a copy in the library Finding libraries that hold this item Electronic books Additional Physical Format: Print version: Kaptchuk, Ted J. Document, Internet resource Document Type: Ted J Kaptchuk Find more information about: Ted J Kaptchuk. Reviews User-contributed reviews Add a review and share your thoughts with other readers.

The Web That Has No Weaver: Understanding Chinese Medicine by Ted J. Kaptchuk - Read Online

Be the first. Add a review and share your thoughts with other readers. Similar Items Related Subjects: Medicine, Chinese -- Philosophy. Medicine, Chinese Traditional. User lists with this item 2 Other Library Ebooks 3 items by otterpop updated Linked Data More info about Linked Data.

Primary Entity http: MediaObject , schema: CreativeWork , schema: This malformed URI has been treated as a string - 'http:

Related Posts:


Copyright © 2019 adundestikir.ga. All rights reserved.